Rosacea Treatment and care

Treating your Rosacea with Grahams

Rosacea is a chronic vascular disorder affecting the facial skin and eyes; often is characterized by a chronic cycle of remission and flare. Regardless of disease severity; there are cosmetic consequences for the patient including flushing, redness, telangiectasia (appearance of red blood vessels on the skin surface), papules, and/or pustules. Because there is no cure for the disease, management consists of the avoidance of disease triggers and the use of both prescription and over-the-counter products that work in concert to achieve remission, prevent flare, and camouflage disease manifestations such as flushing and redness.
 

Keeping the skin soft

Moisturising is important in order to maintain the softness and elasticity of the skin, and therapeutic moisturisers devoid of irritants are important adjunctive therapy in rosacea management. A large proportion of rosacea patients have dry skin, and some topical rosacea medications (e.g. topical metronidazole) can cause further drying and irritation. Moisturisers formulated with a combination of emollients and humectants are recommended to help keep the stratum corneum intact to either repair or prevent skin barrier dysfunction. Furthermore, moisturising dry skin lessens the itchiness and irritation that rosacea patients often experience as a part of their condition. Of course we would always recommend our natural moisturising lotion!
 

Known irritants

The facial skin of patients with rosacea is often hyperirritable compared with that of healthy patients. Use of nonirritant emollients helps to improve barrier function and provides a physical barrier to the ingress or irritants and trigger substances;as well as redressing symptoms of dryness. Several common skin care ingredients have been identified as rosacea triggering agents; these include astringents (ethanol) alcohol, witch hazel, fragrance, menthol, peppermint, eucalyptus oil; each of these are volatile agents that are likely to strip lipids and exacerbate transepidermal waterloss. Other reports indicate that benzyl alcohol (a known skin irritant) contributes to irritation and flare up.
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